Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, CTPO, Conrad van Alphen – Mozart, Vieutemps, Dvořák Concert Review

Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, CTPO, Conrad van Alphen – Mozart, Vieutemps, Dvořák Concert Review

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Conrad van Alphen
Soloist: Nikita Boriso-Glebsky
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday 5 May 2016

Mozart – Symphony no. 38 “Prague”
An evening billed as “Perfect Prague” prompted the thought that music not only transcends time, but also space. It was easy to believe that our Cape Town Concert Hall, right at the end of Africa’s cul-de-sac, was somehow in the same place as those halls in which Mozart stood. Van Alphen began with a stately, lofty adagio, to parallel the finest performances of this work, refreshing into an allegro which quickened the pulse and hit all the right spots. I was reminded how great conductors allow a skilled orchestra to play as a chamber group, and encourage them to listen to each other for timing. This must be very liberating – the conductor is then free to indicate interpretation and expression, instead of being weighed down by the mechanical task of time-keeping. I was so impressed by his minimal style that showed the CTPO as world class orchestra, that I thought the first movement deserved applause, however inappropriate.

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Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, Conrad van Alphen, CTPO

Nikita Boriso-Glebsky Vieuxtemps Violin Concerto no. 4 about to play his encore “Furies” from Ysaÿe Violin Sonata no. 2

Vieuxtemps – Violin Concerto no. 4
Seeing Nikita Boriso-Glebsky performing this work, the first thing that comes across is his amazing sensitivity – his opening note appears like a mirage from another dimension. Then follows his profound demonstration of technique that enables an articulate, emotionally intuitive interpretation. A hidden jewel in the violin repertoire, the concerto was spectacularly presented in velvety romantic serenades and sparkling precision-cut facets. With seamlessly flowing bow technique and exceptional speed, Boriso-Glebsky trails a string of the highest international awards available. However, his full-house standing ovation was earned through nothing less than a spectacular performance and fluid synergy with the CTPO under conductor van Alphen. The ensemble in the second movement with the celli was sublime, and the scherzo-trio was blistering – twice! Belgian virtuoso Vieuxtemps repeats the belief-defying first section, as if to tempt fate and prove that it wasnt fluke the first time! And proof we certainly had! It seems that the lesson in impossibility was indeed repeatable.

And it continued with an encore by Vieuxtemps’ student: Ysaÿe Violin Sonata no. 2, 4th movement – “Furies”. But fury we had not, just wide eyes, stunned clapping, and modest attempts at comprehension. This night will be remembered!

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Conrad van Alphen, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Conrad van Alphen after the Dvořák Symphony no. 7 with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Dvořák – Symphony no. 7
Dark winds and strings opened majestically and forebodingly, in what many people told me afterwards is their favourite Dvořák symphony. Van Alphen’s alert energy and awareness was in-suppressible, achieving a masterful blend of syncopation between parts. This was notable in the ecstatic burst of the major theme at the end of the first movement – well done horns and violins! Listening to a performance like this, I could sit back and enjoy world class solos by the CTPO principles, Gabriele von Dürckheim flute, Daniel Prozersky clarinet, and Sergei Burdukov oboe. Van Alphen demonstrated the answer to a fundamental question – What really is conducting? What’s it for? Everything is written in the music, accelerandi, diminuendi, fortissimo, piano, why a conductor? With only minimal tempo indication, his movements for the most part convey his interpretation of nuance, flavour, texture, subtle changes of crispness or sweetness that could never be included in a score. Although the composer has long left this world, I found this performance fresh and original, and very much alive.

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Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, Conrad van Alphen and Louis Heyneman

Nikita Boriso-Glebsky, Conrad van Alphen and Louis Heyneman after the concert

Next week the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra returns with pianist Melvyn Tan conducted by Arjan Tien:

Puccini – Capriccio Sinfonico
Mendelssohn – Piano concerto no.1
Brahms – Symphony no.2

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Alexander Ramm, Conrad van Alphen, CTPO – Balakirev, Tchaikovsky, Vaughan Williams

Alexander Ramm, Conrad van Alphen, CTPO – Balakirev, Tchaikovsky, Vaughan Williams

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Conrad van Alphen
Soloist: Alexander Ramm
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday 28 April 2016

Balakirev – Tamara
What a seductive entrance to the Autumn Symphony Season! This tone poem is a glistening example of Russian orientalism, beautifully interpreted and performed with succinct entries and excellent control by van Alphen and the CTPO. The orchestra described a certain anxiety on which alluring sensuality uneasily balanced, depicting the dark fetish of the title character. Tamara (from a poem by Mikhail Lermontov) waylays travellers in her tower… and when she tires of their company she kills them and flings their bodies into the River Terek. Van Alphen lead an exciting adventure through the mountains and gorges of the Caucasus – highlights of which were a riveting accelerando into the allegro section – Immaculately synchronous! – and a heart-stopping Arabian dance by Sergei Burdukov and Eugene Trofimczyk (oboe and snare drum), demonstrating incredible control at ppp.

Kudos to the artistic direction of the orchestra, to program a work by the most important, and yet least famous member of “The Five”. Balakirev was the founder and mentor of the Russian nationalist group that included Rimsky-Korsakov, Borodin, Mussorgsky, Cui, and himself. In the hardly known Tamara, completed in 1882, we hear in many places exact melody patterns and chord progressions of Rimsky-Korsakov’s extremely famous Scheherazade, composed 6 years later in 1888.

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Alexander Ramm, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, Conrad van Alphen

Alexander Ramm after the Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra and Conrad van Alphen

Tchaikovsky – Variations on a Rococo Theme
Both Alexander Ramm and his cello strike an immediate presence on the stage – from the first touch of his bow during tuning, one could hear the  phenomenal tone of his instrument, the simple open fifths resonating and echoing in the ceiling. So it was no immediate surprise that his sound was amazing, with outstanding projection, but his impressive accuracy was somewhat eye-widening. Deceptively easy-going, the first variations merely hint at what is to come. The delightfully virtuosic passages were executed with bumblebee-like nonchalance, beautiful romanticism, and Paganiniesque flare. Through the evolution of variations, Ramm revealed a tasteful, deliberate vibrato, flawless intonation (I reserve this word for exceptional cases) and double stops that took the roof off the pallet. And what beautiful tone! At one point a sustained note right down on the C string could be heard resonating above the full orchestra.

Charismatic, obviously talented, and giving a performance to rival Maria Kliegel last year, Alexander Ramm left us wanting more, dreaming of Elgar, Dvořák, or Schumann in the near future. Let’s hope he likes it here!

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Alexander Ramm, Conrad van Alphen, Louis Heyneman

Alexander Ramm, Conrad van Alphen and Louis Heyneman after the concert

Vaughan Williams – Symphony no. 2 (A London Symphony)
Van Alphen has a visible confidence in the CTPO that speaks of their skill and ability. At times he engages mostly with eye contact and only minimal movement, as if to let them do what they know because they are doing it well. To indicate specific instruction he becomes animated, to which the orchestra is very responsive, and achieves incredible dynamic surges and recessions. Always reserving enough for the climaxes, he has a natural feeling of the full capacity of the orchestra’s sound and technique. The entry into the scherzo was jaw-dropping, a trill in the winds with pizzicato quavers on strings, perfectly synchronous. There were memorable moments by Suzanne Martens and Jana van der Walt (violin and harp), and Paula Gabriel (viola), but the show-stealer for me was Bridget Wilson’s piccolo solo – beautifully interpreted. It’s so lovely to hear the lower register of the piccolo’s voice in such a magical way, so Pan-like.

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Conrad van Alphen, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Conrad van Alphen after the Vaughan Williams Symphony no. 2, with the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky – Beethoven Piano Concerto Cycle Part 1

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky – Beethoven Piano Concerto Cycle Part 1

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Victor Yampolsky
Soloist: François Du Toit
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Wednesday 24 February 2016

We are extremely fortunate to have amongst our academia, performer and Professor of Piano François Du Toit. He is an amazing artist – a master of all the mesmerism and mystery that may be enticed from his instrument. These two concerts were to celebrate his birthday, his fee generously sponsored by Le Lude of Franschhoek (cellar, restaurant, and guest villa). This is exactly the patronage that our beloved classical music needs in order to thrive, and the result was an unparalleled opportunity for the Cape Town audience to attend the most important piano concerto cycle in history.

For the casual music lover, it was a beautiful journey through the development of Beethoven’s composing style, which can also be seen as the development of Romanticism in music. For the academics it was a two-day field trip. The inspiration of many later works can be heard in this concerto cycle – in the cadenza of the second concerto the dotted rhythm of the Charleston is perceptible – (Beethoven later used this rhythm in the second movement of his piano sonata Op 111.) and in the Rondo of the fourth concerto we can hear the idea for the opening chords of Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No 1.

Attending this cycle, one has the time to notice the little things about Beethoven’s composing style that made him different from his “Classical” peers. The Rondo of the first concerto for example, features a folk melody – an idea that later became the nationalist spirit of many great romantic composers. Of all the recent concerts in the City Hall that should be broadcast to outer space to let the aliens know about Earth Human music, these two concerts are my choice.

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Final downbeat of Piano Conerto No. 5

As the First Piano Concerto opened with sensitive winds, warm double basses and celli, and a comfortable crescendo into the first subject, there was a strong cent of Mozart, and a fascination with the inevitable development of passion and romance, like the knocking of fate. Conductor Yampolsky brilliantly managed the orchestra’s frequent tricky entries on the fourth beat, expertly balanced with Du Toit’s clean technique and beautiful dynamics. The cadenza was as profound in it’s moments of breathtaking suspense as it was technically radiant, phrasing and interpretation making perfect sense throughout.

For me, the Adagio was the highlight of the Second Piano Concerto. There was a slight sense of hedonism in being allowed to float rather decadently through the greatest composer’s sweetest dreams. I had the feeling of drifting in a most agreeable experience that I knew would not be over any time soon.

Progressively, the concerti become more virtuosic and challenging for the orchestra, and by the Fourth Piano Concerto, parts are frequently scored in semiquavers for whole sections. Celli and double basses performed outstandingly on such occasions, running and leaping synchronously. The violas had a most beautiful moment – Beethoven’s sonorous mezzos playing just a few bars in two parts – a show stealer. Yampolsky kept respectable tempi and a very tidy ship, particularly with the off-beat quavers echoing the piano in the third movement. Du Toit demonstrated stunning control, plucking melodies from complicated patterns. His pedal technique is incredible – like the focus on a camera, he lifts the sustain and refocuses during trills and runs, giving his performance a polish that I have rarely heard before. He played the entire concert from memory. The audience would not let him leave the stage, they were noisier and happier than I’ve heard them for a very long time.

Cape Town is indeed very fortunate to have a resident performer and Professor such as François Du Toit.

Louis Heneman, François Du Toit

Louis Heneman and François Du Toit after the concert

 

Read Part 2 of François Du Toit’s Beethoven Piano Concerto Cycle here.

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky – Beethoven Piano Concerto Cycle Part 2

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky – Beethoven Piano Concerto Cycle Part 2

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Victor Yampolsky
Soloist: François Du Toit
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday 25 February 2016

Prometheus
The second half of François Du Toit’s birthday party began with a synchronous dominant seventh, leading into a beautiful theme from Beethoven’s immortal beloved winds. Conductor Yampolsky’s perfectionism, precise communication, and exciting interpretation secured this overture as another shining example of the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra’s high calibre. The second subject in the violins was crisp and refreshing like crunchy lettuce. All the string parts are technically demanding, and were well performed to the virtuosic standard of the composer.

Victor Yampolsky, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Victor Yampolsky and the CTPO after performing the Prometheus Overture

Throughout the stunning opening movement of the Third Piano Concerto I could not take my eyes off the keys, watching clean runs, accentuated phrase endings, and passionate legato melodies. The cadenza suspended reason – the trills seemed automated, like the sorcerers apprentice commanding the broom. Yampolsky brought the orchestra into synchronous entries like a single breathing being, voicing a beautiful fugue in the 3rd movement between celli, violas, violins, and double basses and winds, each part sounding as one, a sublime quartet.

The Fifth Piano Concerto commenced in all the regalia and sweeping majesty of it’s epithet Emperor. Du Toit reigned absolute, with such precision of emotive dynamics, like pristine diamonds dropping from the piano. The audience was free to wonder how Beethoven composed this work after becoming completely deaf. Were we the first audience to wonder if perhaps he was able to “hear” better without the distractions of earthly sound? Perhaps only because of his loss of hearing, was he able to engage in the most profound conversations with the cosmos, and take down the dictation of the music he was hearing in that state of consciousness. Certainly, his lofty first movement theme in the high register of the piano had the audience suspended as if by threads from Heaven. Do we hear in Beethoven’s deafness, the Music of the Spheres?

The adagio was exquisite – each note a drop of liquid gold, sustained by stunning control from the horns, holding that mystical space between the 2nd and 3rd movement – and what a finale! A world-class dialogue between piano and orchestra, amazingly balanced. One of the notes I made during the performance read: “How can one instrument match so many? Beethoven!” Clearly I was a little over-excited, but it wasnt just me – an international swallow I spoke to excitedly told me that he would call it “The Event of the Season”.

François Du Toit, Victor Yampolsky, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

During François Du Toit’s standing ovation, the CTPO struck up “Happy Birthday”, joined by the audience

 

Next Thursday the CTPO returns with conductor Omri Hadari for the Jewish Community Gala:

Bernstein – Candide Overture

Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue

Rachmaninov – Symphony no. 2

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Jack Liebeck, Victor Yampolsky – Strauss, Bruch, Brahms #ConcertReview

Jack Liebeck, Victor Yampolsky – Strauss, Bruch, Brahms #ConcertReview

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Victor Yampolsky
Guest Artist: Jack Liebeck
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday, 18 February 2016

Last Thursday saw the return of one of the worlds finest conductors Maestro Victor Yampolsky, directing rising star Jack Liebeck in the Bruch Violin concerto. The concert was sold out, and to my ear Liebeck’s performance emerged among the highest peaks in recent CTPO concerts, along with Joshua Bell’s Tchaikovsky last year. If I am not alone in perceiving the climbing standard of Cape Town’s classical concerts, then perhaps those who are in a position to support the arts are realising the power that they have to bring out performers of such a high calibre as we have recently seen. If this is the case, then Cape Town is lucky indeed, for art thrives when patrons delight in experiencing the finest quality in the world.

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Strauss – Don Juan
Virtuosity, however, is in no way guaranteed by generous patronage. It is only by focusing a significant amount of talent, that one achieves skill with an instrument. The tone poems of Richard Strauss are beautiful, notorious, and treacherous reefs that will wreck a lesser orchestra, but last Thursday the CTPO demonstrated virtuosic talent, singular focus, and seemingly limitless ability. Synchronous strings, breath-taking winds, and emphatic solos were a reminder of the brilliant Symphonie Fantastique two weeks ago, and that clearly, Cape Town has a world class orchestra, capable of performing the most challenging works in the repertoire. Brass were absolutely amazing, their finale theme shining over shimmering violins. Maestro Yampolsky’s conducting is always a pleasure to watch. He has a Karajanesque flare for dramatic timing – a master of accuracy, sensitivity, and surprising dynamics.

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Jack Liebeck, Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, Victor Yampolsky

Jack Liebeck’s Bruch – an extraordinary performance of a delightfully high standard.

Bruch – Violin Concerto No. 1
Liebeck’s entrance was a velvety soft cover for laser accuracy, that quickly became intense and exciting. The first subject revealed his virtuoso, as well as a sensitivity to changes, and a foresight to align himself before they happen. If he were a racing driver, there would be a glass of champagne on the dashboard with not one drop spilled after the race, and he would have won. It was easy to enjoy the smooth fast ride, searing flourishes, and heroic balance with the orchestra. His interpretation was fresh and vibrant and gave a sense of continuity without missing anything important emotionally. The adagio arrived with little warning, just the onset of a sublime moment as wonderful as anyone could desire, lovely support from the violas. The entry into the finale was surprising, like the pounce of a panther. It was an extraordinary performance of a delightfully high standard.

If you run you can catch Liebeck’s performance with Amandine Savary at the Baxter this Saturday 20 Feb 8pm! Debussy, Beethoven, Lalo, Brahms
http://www.ctconcerts.co.za/concerts/jack-liebeck/

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Victor Yampolsky, Suzanne Martens, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Conductor Victor Yampolsky and concert master Suzanne Martens after Brahms Symphony 4, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Brahms – Symphony No. 4
There was something about the opening of this work that felt like the beginning of a voyage – leaving port in fine weather, venturing into the open ocean, secure in the hands of an experienced captain. (Orchestra CEO Louis Heyneman used a similar metaphor at the reception after the concert!) One could be forgiven for imagining a huge steering wheel on Yampolsky’s podium. In fact, he seemed to be conducting not only the ship, but also the ocean, surging and receding in delicious rich colours. His tempi were exciting but responsible, and we felt safe even in the high swell, as he artfully navigated through Brahms’ frequently overlapping currents of 2 beats against 3.

The andante was an enchanting fluid legato, searching deeply and discovering profoundly.

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Next week our virtuoso orchestra returns:

The Complete Beethoven Piano Concerti
Conductor: Victor Yampolsky
Soloist: François Du Toit

Wednesday 24 February Piano Concerti 1,2 and 4
Thursday 25 February Piano Concerti 3 and 5 (“Emperor”)

BOOK NOW AT COMPUTICKET OR ARTSCAPE DIAL-A-SEAT: 021 421 7695

Olga Kern, Bernhard Gueller – Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Berlioz #ConcertReview

Olga Kern, Bernhard Gueller – Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Berlioz #ConcertReview

Reviewed by Andy Wilding

Conductor: Bernhard Gueller
Soloist: Olga Kern
Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday, 11 February 2016

For those who did not brave the chaos of the #ZumaMustFall “state of the nation address” – what a concert!

Ms Kern’s return to her beloved Cape Town was received with an exhilarating sense of wonder, and a feeling that one is very fortunate to be in the audience of such a talented and and inspiring artist.

Olga Kern, Bernhard Gueller, CTPO, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra #ClassicalReview

Olga Kern after the Tchaikovsky, with Bernhard Gueller and the CTPO

Tchaikovsky – Piano Concerto No. 3
If striking elegance, wiry strength, and washes of running fluidity are Kern’s calling cards, then last Thursday she played all her aces. I enjoyed her imaginative interpretation of the concerto, which I found fitting as the composer himself was not a pianist, and must have relied greatly on his own imagination when composing piano music. Often reaching beyond what seems possible, his work requires a certain imagination to perform. The cadenza extends belief in the potential of the instrument. With imploding complexity, it culminates in a point of singularity, a trill that sustains until order and believability is restored. It was quite a journey – a riveting performance of brilliant technique and exceptional balance.

And how did the CTPO follow such an astonishing performance? In a sweeping victory of artistic direction…

Tchiakovsky – Eugene Onegin: Polonaise
Yes! Exactly perfect! Already a little bamboozled by the concerto, the audience that night were swept into a triumphant procession of greatness and excitement, the likes of which so few other composers can approach, and the delivery was immaculate. I hope very much that the recording made that night will be available to play on FMR – this performance deserves a place as one of the orchestra’s greatest show pieces. They absolutely nailed it, and they looked like they were having fun! Amazing to be there.

Farida Bacharova, Bernhard Gueller, CTPO, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra #ClassicalReview

Conductor Bernhard Gueller congratulating concert master Farida Bacharova

And the excitement didnt stop there…

Rachmaninov – Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
After just a few minutes rest (the Polonaise is only 4 and a half minutes) our soloist was back for one of the most popular works in the repertoire. Conductor Gueller somehow managed to bring the surprises even in such a well loved work. Each variation hit the ground running, or in Ms Kern’s case skimming infinitely like a flat pebble across a tranquil blue lake. The syncopation makes the work challenging for any orchestra, often playing off the beat. With Gueller expertly and sensitively matching the tempo of Rachmaninov’s relentless piano, the CTPO handled this excellently, bringing to us those outstanding moments by Caroline Prozesky horn, Daniel Prozesky clarinet, Farida Bacharova violn, and Eugene Trofimczyk glockenspiel. Kern’s delivery was romantic and lovely, appropriately sublime or mind bending where required. All the favourite variations lived up to high expectations. Beautiful performance Olga Kern! Thank you.

We were treated to an encore: Rachmaninov Moment Musicaux Op. 16 No. 4 – a right hand of graceful power floating over the left hand cascade of stunning technique.

Bernhard Gueller, CTPO, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra #ClassicalReview

The final downbeat of the Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique, Bernhard Gueller with the CTPO

Berlioz – Symphonie Fantastique
This is a great peace to watch! There is so much magic and chaos in the sound, that it’s sometimes hard to imagine how the many elements and interruptions can be performed live, in real time, one take. It seems that, aside from conducting this work, one also needs to be an event co-ordinator, and Gueller plied this skill effortlessly along with his signature passion, tasteful balance, and love of surprises. A crown jewel of the symphonic repertoire, it was a rare treat to witness this performance unfolding before our senses. The waltz was a lightly wafting bright hazy afternoon surrealist dream, like elephants in hot air balloons floating around inside the concert hall.

Another show piece for the CTPO, it was an outstanding performance from the whole orchestra. Strings were clean and fresh, brass were strong, amazing performances from all the winds, bassoons mastered a very technical section, completely together. Jaw dropping solos from Gabriele von Durkheim flute, Sergei Burdukov oboe, Olga Burdukov cor anglais, and Daniel Prozesky’s extremely difficult wobbly witch clarinet solo – a tune made of trills – all but stole the show.

Olga Kern, Victor Yampolsky, Bernhard Gueller

Olga Kern, Victor Yampolsky, and Bernhard Gueller at the reception. Don’t miss Yampolsky next Thursday!

No government interference next week: Thursday 18 Feb

Strauss – Don Juan
Bruch – Violin Concerto No.1
Brahms – Symphony No. 4

Conductor: Victor Yampolsky
Violin: Jack Liebeck

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FOM Gala Concert – Antonio Pompa-Baldi, Bernhard Gueller, CTPO

FOM Gala Concert – Antonio Pompa-Baldi, Bernhard Gueller, CTPO

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Antonio Pompa-Baldi plays Brahms 2 in Cape Town

Reviewed by Andrew Wilding

Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra, City Hall, Thursday 19 November 2015

What an amazing year for classical music in Cape Town! We have seen some of the brightest celebrities on the international circuit – Joshua Bell, Maria Kliegel, and last week Antonio Pompa-Baldi – walking onto the City Hall stage. As a non-profit organisation, FOM will direct all proceeds from this gala to support Cape Town’s orchestras and instrumentalists in 2016.

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Brahms – Symphony no.3
Bernhard Gueller, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

We are very fortunate to have Bernhard Gueller as a frequent guest conductor. His style and sound are characterised by a lyrical balance of sensitivity and surging power. Leading often by the mere change of facial expression, he always brings the best out of the orchestra and last Thursday was no exception, with stunning solos from the wind section – Sergei Burdukov oboe, Caroline Prozesky horne, Daniel Prozesky clarinet, Gabriele von Dürckheim flute – artfully carrying Brahms’ beautiful melodies.

The standard of performance was such that it allowed the natural function of Brahm’s music to emerge. His music has the potential to hold a space for the audience in which they can unpack accumulated stress, mental turmoil, and emotional anguish, and let go. It reaches all the sadness in ourselves and the world and establishes a dogma for it, a system of order that emerges from the wash of emotion. And somehow this dogma is very compassionate, and essentially in the case of this symphony, uplifting and liberating. In the paradoxically private sanctuary of a concert hall, one can experience the feeling of being moved – but only if the delivery is of an exceptional quality, and this was the wonderful case in both works for the FOM Gala Concert.

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Antonio Pompa-Baldi, Bernhard Gueller, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

Antonio Pompa-Baldi after playing Brahms Piano Concerto No.2

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Brahms – Piano Concerto No.2
Antonio Pompa-Baldi, Bernhard Gueller, Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra

It occasionally bears observing, that Brahms was himself a phenomenal pianist. He invented a previously unknown style of rapidly overlapping, widely spaced arpeggios, that require a somewhat unbelievable grasp of the instrument. It has been a long time since I heard a performance like this, and I don’t think I have ever seen one. Pompa-Baldi’s control of balance and dynamics enable hand-aching technique to sound like soft velvet, the hard edges of the keys seeming to melt into colours. His concerto was a rich luscious painting by an Italian master. There is a sense in his phrasing that speaks of profound mental and emotional understanding of the material, and of exceptional physical expression. The balance in his fingers is stunning, lifting the melody from a rippling accompaniment that spans the entire resister and frequently crosses the melody. His double octaves are astonishing. The orchestra was oceanic and nurturing – a transcendental cello solo from Kristiyan Chernev in the 3rd movement. There was such a tranquillity and beauty to this performance that it may well be remembered as one of the finest moments in the City Hall.

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Bernhard Gueller and Antonio Pompa-Baldi

Bernhard Gueller with Antonio Pompa-Baldi after the concert